Key to Clean Clear Water


Keeping your water free from bacteria and viruses will be the first thing you will want to start with. This is done in a variety of ways that you as the spa owner will have to decide. Listed below are a few ways this is done. Click on the one you decide to use and follow the instructions. It may be a good idea to print these out.

Chlorine

Chlorine is a very effective sanitizer; it has been used in pools and spas for many years but is slowly being substituted with other available sanitizer because of its harshness and strong odor. If this is the sanitizer that you have chosen you will find it available in granular and 1-inch tablet forms. The granular form can be distributed directly into the water; usually 2 tablespoons every other day will keep the required level (1.5-3.0 PPM) to maintain a bacteria free spa. A test kit is required to achieve this balance. If you are using the 1-inch tablet form, a floater that houses the tablets will need to be purchased. Once the floater is loaded with approximately 4 to 6 tablets it is then set in the water and is distributed through erosion. This choice is the most popular and convenient.

Once again, you will need to maintain the proper reading with a test kit to keep your water fresh and clean. The next step in setting up a "healthy spa" is checking the pH, total alkalinity and calcium hardness. These are very important measurements to keep in balance; they keep the water from becoming corrosive, which will attack heating elements, pump seals and internal gas fired heaters. Read all about these important three in Understanding Water Chemistry section.

Shocking the spa water once a week or during heavy bather use, is also a must. This is done with a non-chlorine shock or oxidizer; these eliminate odors and reduce irritating contaminants for fresh, clear water. Remember because of the high temperatures and heavy bather loads, spas require higher sanitizer levels, as well as heavier oxidizer doses to eliminate bather waste and maintain clear, sparkling water.

Also recommended, as part of your arsenal to keep your spa healthy is an enzyme based clarifier. This chemical is used literally to eat body oils that attach to the spa surface giving it the "ring around the tub" title. It also helps keep your filter from clogging therefore making it last longer. You can read about this product in the Informative Articles section.

Last but not least, get a thermometer that will tell you the temperature of the spa water. This takes any guessing out along with keeping the water safe for bathers.

There are several other different chemicals available, but are not essential in keeping your spa "healthy." For example: if foaming is a problem, there is a chemical for that. If you have water high in minerals, there is something available for that. If making the water smell like a particular scent is something you want you can find this and all that was mentioned, in the spa chemicals and accessories section.

Notes on chlorine-bromine use: More is not better when using these chemicals, it very important not to overload or try to "shock" your spa water with them. If you do, you stand an excellent chance of causing equipment failure due to corrosion. A non-chlorine shock or oxidizers are available for doing this. (top)

Bromine

Bromine has become the most popular way to sanitize a spa. It is very effective and does not have that "strong odor" that chlorine typically has. It is available in 1-inch tablets and must be distributed into the water with a floater. The floater is loaded with approximately 4 to 6 tablets; it is then set in the water and is distributed through erosion. The proper reading for bromine is 3.0 - 5.0 PPM. Use a test kit to achieve this. The next step in setting up a "healthy spa" is checking the pH, total alkalinity and calcium hardness. These are very important measurements to keep in balance; they keep the water from becoming corrosive, which will attack heating elements, pump seals and internal gas fired heaters. They should be checked once a week or if you have added water or if you have had an unusual bather load. Read all about these important three in Understanding Water Chemistry section.

Shocking the spa water once a week or during heavy bather use is also a must. This is done with a non-chlorine shock or oxidizer; these eliminate odors and reduce irritating contaminants for fresh, clear water. Remember because of the high temperatures and heavy bather loads, spas require higher sanitizer levels, as well as heavier oxidizer doses to eliminate bather waste and maintain clear, sparkling water.

Also recommended, as part of your arsenal to keep your spa healthy is an enzyme-based clarifier. This chemical is used literally to eat body oils that attach to the spa surface giving it the "ring around the tub" title. It also helps keep your filter from clogging therefore making it last longer. You can read about this product in the Informative Articles section.

Last but not least, get a thermometer that will tell you the temperature of the spa water. This takes any guessing out along with keeping the water safe for bathers.

There are several other different chemicals available, but are not essential in keeping your spa "healthy." For example: if foaming is a problem, there is a chemical for that. If you have water high in minerals, there is something available for that. If making the water smell like a particular scent is something you want you can find this and all that was mentioned, in the spa chemicals and accessories section. (top)

Ozone

Are you using ozone, or have you thought about using ozone? It is a very effective and highly recommended way to sanitize spa water. Read all about this excellent sanitizer in our Informative Articles and Instructions section.

If you or one of your family members are allergic, or have had a reaction to chlorine or bromine, then this is something you may want to consider.

NOTE: Contrary to popular belief, ozone does not make your spa a chemical free spa.

Checking the pH, total alkalinity and calcium hardness is something you still should be doing on a weekly basis. These are very important measurements to keep in balance; they keep the water from becoming corrosive, which will attack heating elements, pump seals and internal gas fired heaters. Read all about these important three in the Understanding Water Chemistry section. They should be checked once a week or if you have added water or if you have had an unusual bather load.

Shocking the spa water once a week or during heavy bather use is also a must. This is done with a non-chlorine shock or oxidizer; these eliminate odors and reduce irritating contaminants for fresh, clear water. Remember because of the high temperatures and heavy bather loads, spas require higher sanitizer levels, as well as heavier oxidizer doses to eliminate bather waste and maintain clear, sparkling water.

Also recommended, as part of your arsenal to keep your spa healthy is an enzyme-based clarifier. This chemical is used literally to eat body oils that attach to the spa surface giving it the "ring around the tub" title. It also helps keep your filter from clogging therefore making it last longer. You can read about this product in the Informative Articles section.

Last but not least, get a thermometer that will tell you the temperature of the spa water. This takes any guessing out along with keeping the water safe for bathers.

There are several other different chemicals available, but are not essential in keeping your spa "healthy." For example: if foaming is a problem, there is a chemical for that. If you have water high in minerals, there is something available for that. If making the water smell like a particular scent is something you want you can find this and all that was mentioned, in the spa chemicals and accessories section. (top)

Nature 2

Another breakthrough in establishing alternatives to chlorine and bromine. Read all about this product in the Informative Articles section. Nature 2 is the #1 chlorine alternative, according to an independent spa industry survey. This is definitely a chemical that should be checked out. Checking the pH, total alkalinity and calcium hardness is something you still should be doing on a weekly basis. These are very important measurements to keep in balance; they keep the water from becoming corrosive, which will attack heating elements, pump seals and internal gas fired heaters. Read all about these important three in Understanding Water Chemistry section. They should be checked once a week, or if you have added water, or if you have had an unusual bather load.

Shocking the spa water once a week or during heavy bather use is also a must. This is done with a non-chlorine shock or oxidizer; these eliminate odors and reduce irritating contaminants for fresh, clear water.

Remember, because of the high temperatures and heavy bather loads, spas require higher sanitization levels, as well as heavier oxidizer doses to eliminate bather waste and maintain clear, sparkling water.

Also recommended, as part of your arsenal to keep your spa healthy is an enzyme-based clarifier. This chemical is used literally to eat body oils that attach to the spa surface, removing "ring around the tub". It also helps keep your filter from clogging therefore making it last longer. You can read about this product in the Informative Articles section.

Last but not least, get a thermometer that will tell you the temperature of the spa water. This takes any guessing out along with keeping the water safe for bathers.

There are several other different chemicals available, but are not essential in keeping your spa "healthy." For example, if foaming is a problem, there is a chemical for that. If you have water high in minerals, there is something available for that. If making the water smell like a particular scent is something you want, you can find this and all that was mentioned in the spa chemicals and accessories section. (top)